On the other hand, a verb such as to leave (individual words are in italic /pa?/pronounced scripts): in Hungarian, verbs have a poly-personal agreement, which means that they correspond to more than one of the arguments of the verb: not only with its subject, but also with its (precise) object. There is a distinction between the case where there is a particular object and the case where the object is indeterminate or where there is no object at all. (Adverbians have no influence on the form of the verb.) Examples: Szeretek (I like someone or something unspecified), more (I love him, she, she or she, in particular), szeretlek (I love you); szeret (he loves me, us, you, someone or something indeterminate), szereti (he loves him, him or her specifically). Of course, names or pronouns can specify the exact object. In short, there is a correspondence between a verb and the person and the number of its subject and the specificity of its object (which often relates more or less precisely to the person). • A question of who or what takes a singular verb. There are also matches in the number. For example: Vitabu viwili vitatosha (Two books will be enough), Michungwa miwili itatosha (Two orange trees will be enough), Machungwa mawili yatatosha (Two oranges will be enough). In English, defective verbs usually do not show a match for the person or number, they contain modal verbs: can, can, must, must, must, must, should, should, should.

But if one of the nouns has a collective meaning or refers to a single idea, the verb should be singular. However, if the neutral parts are presented as different, contrasting or confronted realities, a plural code should be used. All regular (and almost all irregular) verbs in English correspond to the singular of the third person indicative by adding a suffix of -s or -lui. The latter is usually used according to the stems that end in the sischlauten sh, ch, ss or zz (z.B. it rushes, it watches, it accumulates, it buzzes). 3. Composite subjects that are related by and always in the plural. Verbs have 6 different forms in the present tense, for three people in the singular and plural.

As in Latin, the subject is often abandoned. The following peculiarities of the subject-verb agreement help to clarify the importance of complex constructions in Spanish. For example, keep in mind that in English, the sequence of words tends to follow the convention, the verb, the indirect object, and then the direct object, whereas these elements are interchangeable in Spanish. This ability makes it possible to use plural or singulate abraisses depending on whether they appear before or after the subject. And because Spanish allows tacit subjects in all people, unlike English, which only allows tacit verbs in the second person, the correspondence in person and in number between the subject and the verb can confuse native English speakers. . . .