178. We reaffirm that small island developing States, given their unique and particular vulnerabilities, including their small size, remoteness, narrow resource and export base and exposure to global environmental challenges and external economic shocks, including a large number of effects of climate change and potentially more frequent and intense natural disasters, remain a special case for sustainable evolution This is the first time I have done so. We are concerned that the results of the five-year review of the Mauritius Strategy have concluded that small island developing States have made less economic progress than most other groups or even declined, particularly in poverty reduction and debt sustainability. Sea-level rise and other adverse effects of climate change continue to pose a significant risk to small island developing States and their efforts towards sustainable development, and pose the greatest threat to their survival and viability, including some through loss of territory. We remain concerned that, while small island developing States have made progress in the areas of gender, health, education and the environment, their progress in achieving the Millennium Development Goals has been broadly heterogeneous. 179. We call for continued and strengthened efforts to assist small island developing States in the implementation of the Barbados Programme of Action and the Mauritius Strategy. We also call for enhanced United Nations system support to small island developing States, in line with the many challenges that lie ahead and that lie ahead in achieving sustainable development. On the basis of the Barbados Programme of Action and the Mauritius Strategy, we call for the convening in 2014 of a third international conference on small island developing States, recognizing the importance of coordinated, balanced and integrated actions to address the sustainable development challenges faced by small island developing States, and we invite the General Assembly at its thirty-seventh session to define the modalities of the conference. The islands dominated the Negotiations at the Paris COP. [1] From metaphor to moral compass to declarations of kinship – such as President Obama`s – the vulnerability, dignity and ambitions of small island developing states have served as a rudder. Decision 4/16. Review of the implementation of the programme of action for the sustainable development of small island developing States A.

General considerations 1.La Commission recalls that the Global Conference on the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States, held in 1994, adopted the Programme of Action for the Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States in order to take concrete action at the national levels, Regional and international in 15 The Committee on the Environment, Health and Health, Health and Health, Health and Health. The Commission notes that its recommendations complement the recommendations of the Action Programme. 2.After considering the report of the Secretary-General on the sustainable development of coastal areas, the Commission considers: tourism, energy resources, air transport, maritime transport, telecommunications and environmental and natural disaster management in small island developing States (E/CN.17/1996/20 and Add.1-7), the report of the Secretary-General on current donor activities for sustainable development in the communities. developing island States (E/CN.1). 7/1996/21) and the Report of the High Representative at the level of the Round Table on Island Developing States (E/CN.17/1996/IDC/3-UNCTAD/LLDC/IDC/3), and taking into account the views expressed, takes note of the measures taken by small island developing States at the national and regional levels to implement the Programme of Action. . . .